Some Marine Invertebrates of Interest for Captive Sexual Reproduction

Group/Species

General Sexual Reproduction Information

Captive Sexual Reproductive Activity

Other Notes:

True Crabs

 

 

 

Mithraculus sculptus (emerald crabs)

brooders

possible, but difficult

The brooding female usually releases the larvae at night. The larvae are delicate and need to be housed in a kreisel.  They must also be fed in order for them to survive (though they can live up to 3 days without food).

Mithraculus forceps

brooders

possible, but difficult

(see above) Lab research reports greater success raising M. forceps larvae than M. sculptus larvae.

Lybia tesselata

brooders

thought to be possible, but difficult

The eggs turn color before hatching. 

Gastropoda & Polyplacophora

 

 

 

Cerith sp.

 

depends on species

It seems that some species reproduce (via unknown means) in home aquaria without any aquarist assistance. Other species don’t appear to reproduce in captivity at all.  However, most all species seen in reef aquariums can be caught laying on glass and rocks (often in zig zag patterns).

select tropical Collonista sp.

 

 

reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance

 

Columbellids, Euplica sp.

 

egg layer

reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance

These snails are sometimes misindentified as Strombus maculates

Cyprea annulus (Money Cowries)

egg layer

These snails are known to lay eggs which hatch into larvae without aquarist assistance.

For whatever reason, survival of the larvae appears to be the challenge to successfully breeding these snails in captivity.

select tropical Nassarius sp.

egg layer

reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance

Depending on species, these snails will reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance or not at all.

Trochus stellatus

broadcast spawner

These snails are known to reproduce in captivity, especially with aquarist assistance.

Because these animals are broadcast spawners, they usually need an aquarist to ensure that eggs and sperm come into contact for fertilization.  Otherwise few, if any, larvae result from spawning events.

select tropical Turbo sp.

 

depends on species, some reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance

 

Scutus sp.

broadcast spawner

sometimes reproduce in aquariums even without aquarist assistance

Because these animals are broadcast spawners, they would likely benefit from aquarist assistance to ensure egg fertilization.

Stomatella varia

probably broadcast spawners

reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance

The perfect reef tank snail.

 

Shrimp

 

 

 

Hymenocera picta (harlequin shrimp)

Hymenocera elegans (harlequin shrimp)

brooders

Some aquarists have been able to raise the larvae through a few stages of development, but have been unable to see them settle.

The brooding female usually releases the larvae at night. The larvae are delicate and need to be housed in a kreisel.  They must also be fed in order for them to survive.  Unfortunately, finding an appropriate food source (and density) has proved to be a challenge.

Thor amboinensis (sexy shrimp)

brooders

 

 

Lysmata amboinensis

Lysmata grabhami

(skunk cleaner shrimp)

brooders

Captive rearing of larvae to adulthood has been accomplished in labs.  However, there has been little success among hobbyists.

The brooding female usually releases the larvae at night. The larvae are delicate and need to be housed in a kreisel.  They must also be fed in order for them to survive.  Unfortunately, finding an appropriate food source (and density) has proved to be a challenge.  Imperfect kresisels/housing may also be an issue along with possible contamination/disease problems.

Lysmata debelius (fire shrimp)

brooders

Captive rearing of larvae has been accomplished by hobby aquarists.

http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/nov2004/breeder.htm

 

Lysmata wurdemanni (peppermint shrimp)

brooders

Captive rearing of larvae to adulthood has been accomplished in labs.  However, there has been little success among hobbyists.

The brooding female usually releases the larvae at night. The larvae are delicate and need to be housed in a kreisel.  They must also be fed in order for them to survive.  Unfortunately, finding an appropriate food source (and density) has proved to be a challenge.  Imperfect kresisels/housing may also be an issue along with possible contamination/disease problems.

Stenopus sp.

(banded coral shrimp)

brooders, form strong mated pairs

Some aquarists have been able to raise the larvae through a few stages of development, but have been unable to see them settle..

Spawning usually occurs at night approximately every 2 weeks (give or take a few days depending on species).  The larvae should be fed right away (may be prone to cannibalism).

Enchinoderms

 

 

 

Family Ophiactidae

 

Several aquarium species reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance.

This family includes colored mini and micro brittle stars.

Family Amphiuridae

 

Several aquarium species reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance.

This family includes white mini brittle stars.

Family Asterinidae

 

Several aquarium species reproduce in home aquariums without aquarist assistance

This family includes “astrea” or “mini sea stars”

Urchins

broadcast spawners

thought possible

some new information should be available soon

Cephalopods

 

 

 

Sepia bandensis

 

successfully bred and raised in captivity

http://www.thecephalopodpage.org/Sepiabandensis.php

Other

 

 

 

Clibanarius sp. (marine hermit crabs)

 

brooders

Captive rearing of larvae has been accomplished by hobby aquarists.

Determining the sex of these animals can be quite difficult.